Revisiting Continuous Curve Machine Quilting

Back in June, I shared a step-by-step tutorial for Continuous Curve Machine Quilting with a Walking Foot. This quilting pattern has been a favorite of mine since I first learned it almost 30 years ago. The version I shared was (and is) a fantastic beginner-friendly starting point, but I thought you might be ready for a quick update – and more photos!

Here’s the table runner I shared in my previous post:

Table Runner featuring continuous curve quilting, designed and made by Beth Ann Williams, (C) 2022.

And the view from the back:

From the back – table runner featuring continuous curve quilting, designed and made by Beth Ann Williams, (C) 2022.

I included numerous diagrams to show the stitching path in my previous post, so I won’t repeat them here. But I thought you might like to see some examples of Continuous Curve variation with diagonal stitching added.

Here’s a close-up of a single block:

Continuous curve quilting variation with diagonal stitching added – class sample from Easy & Effective Machine Quilting with a Walking Foot with Beth Ann Williams

And here it is action:

Table Runner featuring continuous curve quilting variation with diagonal stitching added, made by Beth Ann Williams, (C) 2022.

A closer look from the back:

From the back – table runner featuring continuous curve quilting variation with diagonal stitching added, made by Beth Ann Williams, (C) 2022.

Doesn’t it add even more pizzazz to an already interesting design?

You can mark both the curves and the diagonal stitching, but I generally find it a lot easier (and faster!) to just eyeball both. I don’t worry about minor imperfections. You may notice little wobbles when they are 6 inches from your nose; but, they will disappear into the overall graphic nature of the design once the quilt has been washed a time or two.

Here’s what it looks like when I’ve isolated a row for stitching:

Isolating a row for stitching.

Folding the sides of the quilt to create a long tube (which is then accordion-pleated on my lap) makes the quilt a lot easier to manage!

There’s lots more to explore with Continuous Curve stitching – other shapes & combinations, as well as free-motion techniques. But I think this is a good place to leave it for today. 🙂

Happy Quilting!

Beth Ann

When health challenges made hand-sewing (and hand appliqué and hand-quilting) no longer physically viable for her, Beth Ann’s first instinct was dismay and discouragement. But Grandma Baldwin gave her a loving (but stern!) “No pity parties – just figure out a different way.” So Beth Ann turned to her trusty sewing machine and began devising ways to achieve the fine quality appliqué look she craved faster and easier than she ever thought possible. And a career was born! Now Beth Ann enjoys sharing her accessible “invisible” machine appliqué and creative machine quilting techniques with other quilters and fiber artists around the world.

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